Facebook FOMO

Like I’ve reiterated time and time again, making a presence on social media platforms is key to branding businesses and reaching out to potential customers. Utilizing multiple accounts can sometimes be confusing or seem like too much; however, it’s all about understanding who your audience is and how to cater to their interests using the websites that they enjoy most. Two of the most popular social media sites are none other than Facebook and Twitter.

Source: Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project, February 2013

Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, February 2013

As seen above in this bar graph, Facebook holds down the first place position, Twitter ranking just slightly behind in second place. Each one of the social media platforms presented in this 2013 graph are further divided into four bars expressing certain age groups. The two bars with the largest percentage, in both Facebook and Twitter, are users of 18 to 29 years of age. We all know that the legal drinking age is 21 across the United States, so a pretty good amount of users within the highest ranked age group for these two platforms are allowed to drink. If they aren’t old enough to drink, they can at the very least still go to a nightclub because they are 18.

Nightclub owners can easily find and put this information to use to promote and brand their establishment, or even specific events and specials being held for a limited time. I’ve previously elaborated on how Twitter has been used to its full potential by a bar in the town where I currently reside. It’s such a simplistic and quick networking device to connect with customers. But, what about good ol’ Facebook? Should nightclub owners make a presence on there if they already have other social media accounts up and running?

…hmm. How could we forget about Mark Zuckerberg’s greatest idea? Or stolen… idea…? Eh, whatever.

Using the specific age group statistics from above, nightlife establishments could focus on using Facebook’s numerous attributes rather than sticking to only Twitter, per say.  Wishpond gives five steps for bars and nightclubs to better market themselves and their businesses through Facebook.

  1. Target Your Audience.
  2. Share Photos.
  3. Promote Events.
  4. Create Buzz.
  5. Build Fans.

These five steps may seem rather obvious to some of you, but they are so incredibly important. Any social media site is going to of course get your name better known and build your brand. Though, going the extra mile by using fun-filled visuals to promote your events and create a positive buzz is essential. Personally, I love seeing pictures and videos with confetti, people smiling and dancing, along with so many fun-colored lasers that it looks like a Crayola box just exploded. Visuals like that make me want to just jump into them because they seem like so much fun. Using visuals like the type I just described probably have a much better shot at getting customers through the club doors than some boring picture of people sitting in a booth drinking. What’s the fun in that? Anyone can sit and drink on their couch instead of going out spending money. Presenting those potential customers with numerous, hyped visuals on Facebook makes it harder and harder for them to resist, possibly even creating some FOMO.

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Tripping on Glassid: The Latest Fad

I’m sure we’ve all heard of Google Glass by now, but if you haven’t, it’s basically a computer that can be worn on your face. It has the capability of reflecting projected images while allowing the person to still be able to see through the lenses. You can take photos and short videos with voice commands, along with features like asking for directions and actually seeing the map. On April 4, 2012, the concept of these glasses was introduced  on a Google+ page. Google named the project for research and development of these augmented reality glasses, Project Glass. The video below from the official Google Glass page shows how the eyewear can potentially be utilized.

A few thousand pairs have been set out into the wild by Google, for testing purposes of course. Though they still remain unavailable for people to purchase, these Google Glasses are already creating somewhat of a negative reputation for themselves. It seems as if there are some major concerns being raised about the intrusion of people’s privacy.  Breaching a person’s privacy is a big deal and can cause many issues to arise. Recording people without their permission could easily bring up debate about the use of this device in public, from an ethical standpoint.

In an article, on NY Times’ Bits Blogs, Nick Bilton tells a personal story about his experience at a Google developer conference he recently attended, and how he eventually felt like he was running from the Glass-wearers instead of associating with them.

“My world came screeching to a halt. There they were, a handful of people wearing Google Glass, now standing next to me at their own urinals, peering their head from side to side, blinking or winking, as they relieved themselves.”

Wow. That had to be one of the most uncomfortable things to be involved with. Huge supporters of privacy are also concerned that Glass-wearers will somehow be able to record and broadcast private conversations amongst strangers, and even possibly be able to identify random strangers using facial recognition properties within the eyewear. These privacy scares have already persuaded a few companies post anti-Google Glass signs in their establishments.

Anti-Google Glass sign from stopthecyborgs.org

Anti-Google Glass sign from stopthecyborgs.org

This past March, the 5 Point Cafe, a dive bar and restaurant located in Seattle, was the first business to ban Google Glass in advance. Once these glasses hit the market for sale, they will no longer be allowed in due to the fact that customers go there to not be recognized, which these glasses could obstruct. The bar owner, Dave Meinert, posted a humorous status update on their Facebook page that received over 150 comments of praise and criticism.

“For the record, The 5 Point is the first Seattle business to ban in advance Google Glasses. And ass kickings will be encouraged for violators.”

These augmented-reality glasses are said to possibly be released for sale in 2014, though, I’m not sure if anyone seems to be really positive on that. Regardless, I’m sure there will be more and more businesses like the bar mentioned above who will eventually ban these glasses to protect the privacy rights of their customers. I guess we’ll see!