It’s Better On Top

Source: graphicmania.net

Source: graphicmania.net

Search engine optimization, known as SEO, is an internet marketing strategy used to affect the ability for a webpage to appear within the top results in a search engine like Google, and others alike. This process or “trick” dives into how exactly these search engines work, what people are regularly searching for, and even the keywords that are typed into the search bar. Obviously, the higher the link is placed toward the top of the page, the more clicks it will most likely receive. Therefore utilizing SEO  is a smart way to help increase online traffic to your website, increase patrons through your doors, and  eventually possibly increase your overall sales profit.

This list cracked me up from a website that focuses on nightlife marketing…

SEO is NOT:

  • Magic
  • A myth
  • A fad
  • Pixie dust
  • Science
  • A magic pill that solves all of your business and sales issues
  • A Harry Potter invisibility cloak

There are many companies out there and an abundance online who will conduct your every SEO task or need, but of course in exchange for money. Yes, it’s better on top of the search engine results, and even greater to be in the top three. Though, marketing and branding a nightclub is pretty important to drive customers through the venue doors, it doesn’t take a wizard or genius to figure out how SEO works. Everyone that searches any word online deals with SEO whether they realize it or not. Anyone, including myself, can type in a word and have at least five different words pop up in the drop-down menu trying to basically finish my sentence.

If nightclub owners don’t want to pay these SEO specific companies to get their business’s website or social media sites top ranked, they may be able to do it for themselves. There are many pages that have walk-through tutorials to help you get to know SEO. With a lot of time and trial-and-error effort, any nightclub or bar owner could become their very own SEO specialist.

Top 10 Google Glass “Pre-Bans”

Today I’ve decided that I wasn’t quite finished Tripping On Glassid, and would like to expand a little further on the controversies of Google Glass. Just to have a quick recap, the main issue with this technological advancement is whether or not the wearers of these glasses will, at times, infringe on people’s privacy. Another issue is whether or not the Glass-wearers will be safe, seeing as how basically having a computer on your face could potentially be somewhat distracting to some users.

One restaurant in Seattle has already banned the glasses before they even hit shelves for people to purchase. Though a bar is typically a setting for people to be seen, take pictures and associate with strangers, Google Glass seems to have already overstepped their boundaries, in The 5 Point owner’s eyes, and are not welcome.

A Google spokesperson responds: “It is still very early days for Glass, and we expect that as with other new technologies, such as cell phones, behaviors and social norms will develop over time.”

Hilarious picture taken from rockdoc.com

Hilarious picture taken from rockdoc.com

Maybe that spokesperson is right. Didn’t we find cell phones to be a crazy idea? Now we make fun of the huge, brick-sized cell phones a.k.a. the Zack Morris phone. When they added cameras and integrated video into those mobile devices, weren’t we a tad skeptical? The answer to both of these questions is YES! Though with some time and tinkering with the new gadgets, we’ve grown to love them and accept them as the complete norm. With society as a whole, I feel as if we rarely put them down. They basically have evolved to be part of our hands now–not really, but you catch my drift. So will this happen with Glass? Will we get used to it or will the fad die out after a few months? Nobody can find out until the specs are finally released, but honestly I’m not sure if many people will have the funds to purchase them anyways.

More and more pre-bans are surfacing, the top 10 places being:

10. Banks/ATMs

9. Sports Arenas/Concert Venues

8. Locker Rooms/Dressing Rooms

7. Movie Theaters

6. Cars

5. Hospitals

4. Classrooms

3. Strip Clubs

2. Casinos

1. Bars

Though some of these seem pretty obvious, people may never think to take them off and may record the wrong thing at the wrong time. There is a strong possibility for more places to be added to the ban list in the near future, and I’m sure there will be plenty.

Tripping on Glassid: The Latest Fad

I’m sure we’ve all heard of Google Glass by now, but if you haven’t, it’s basically a computer that can be worn on your face. It has the capability of reflecting projected images while allowing the person to still be able to see through the lenses. You can take photos and short videos with voice commands, along with features like asking for directions and actually seeing the map. On April 4, 2012, the concept of these glasses was introduced  on a Google+ page. Google named the project for research and development of these augmented reality glasses, Project Glass. The video below from the official Google Glass page shows how the eyewear can potentially be utilized.

A few thousand pairs have been set out into the wild by Google, for testing purposes of course. Though they still remain unavailable for people to purchase, these Google Glasses are already creating somewhat of a negative reputation for themselves. It seems as if there are some major concerns being raised about the intrusion of people’s privacy.  Breaching a person’s privacy is a big deal and can cause many issues to arise. Recording people without their permission could easily bring up debate about the use of this device in public, from an ethical standpoint.

In an article, on NY Times’ Bits Blogs, Nick Bilton tells a personal story about his experience at a Google developer conference he recently attended, and how he eventually felt like he was running from the Glass-wearers instead of associating with them.

“My world came screeching to a halt. There they were, a handful of people wearing Google Glass, now standing next to me at their own urinals, peering their head from side to side, blinking or winking, as they relieved themselves.”

Wow. That had to be one of the most uncomfortable things to be involved with. Huge supporters of privacy are also concerned that Glass-wearers will somehow be able to record and broadcast private conversations amongst strangers, and even possibly be able to identify random strangers using facial recognition properties within the eyewear. These privacy scares have already persuaded a few companies post anti-Google Glass signs in their establishments.

Anti-Google Glass sign from stopthecyborgs.org

Anti-Google Glass sign from stopthecyborgs.org

This past March, the 5 Point Cafe, a dive bar and restaurant located in Seattle, was the first business to ban Google Glass in advance. Once these glasses hit the market for sale, they will no longer be allowed in due to the fact that customers go there to not be recognized, which these glasses could obstruct. The bar owner, Dave Meinert, posted a humorous status update on their Facebook page that received over 150 comments of praise and criticism.

“For the record, The 5 Point is the first Seattle business to ban in advance Google Glasses. And ass kickings will be encouraged for violators.”

These augmented-reality glasses are said to possibly be released for sale in 2014, though, I’m not sure if anyone seems to be really positive on that. Regardless, I’m sure there will be more and more businesses like the bar mentioned above who will eventually ban these glasses to protect the privacy rights of their customers. I guess we’ll see!