Klout for Business? Even better.

Yesterday I posted about a social influence service called Klout. Today I will be furthering my discussion on this topic, focusing on the recently added section of this platform, Klout for Business.

“Klout has the largest consumer base of any influence marketing platform. Our business tools empower marketers to identify and engage with millions of top influencers increasing earned media and improving brand lift.”

Like I mentioned in yesterday’s post, Klout can easily be used to make a name for your business. With Klout for Business, Klout developers are making it so much simpler to build your brand that you’ve worked so hard to establish, and keep your social presence booming by making it easier to engage customers. The Klout Perks are still a huge part of the Business section, offering brand trials for top scored Klout users, and making it easier for companies to hold special events and contests.

Through a case study, Klout for Business aimed to increase the conversation of the Chevy Volt by hosting drive-up events, allowing users with a score of 40 or above to loan the vehicle. This one case study had an amazing outcome creating over 95,000 impressions, and even helped to sell 7 Chevy Volts across 6 target cities! With this case study, it is obvious that the Klout for Business platform can be used to drive sales through the roof, especially if used for less expensive merchandise.

CIRQ

In an article by Tim Peterson of AdWeek, he explains in further detail how Klout is becoming one of the most serious marketing platforms, and mentions their possible ideas for the future. What they’re working on is using geofencing locations so that merchants will be notified when Klout mobile app users with a high score walk into their establishment. If the app user accepts, the merchant can then see exactly who the person is and approach them. Klout CEO, Joe Fernandez, said they tested it among a few small restaurants in San Francisco and also during SXSW with Cirque du Soleil where influencers were upgraded seats for performances. It was said to be taken very well.

The testing with Cirque du Soleil opens the doors for all nightlife establishments to use this service. I believe it would drive more users to post on social media sites about their favorite nightclubs, bringing in more money from customers–happy customers.

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Uh. What’s a… Klout?

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For those of you who have no clue what this is, don’t worry, I honestly had no clue what it was until just a few days ago.

Klout is a website and app service that was launched in 2008 to discover certain patterns of social media influence. Using these social media analytics, this service ranks its users with a “Klout Score” which is a number between 0 and 100. These scores are based off of each user’s influence on other people through social networks. Scores are updated everyday from the interactions you have, including retweets from Twitter, likes on Facebook and Instagram, etc. In the past few years, Klout has even started to partner with different companies, giving out what are called “Klout Perks” to users based on their scores. Some of the perks include free products and discounts from brandsĀ  like Microsoft, Sony, Samsung, etc. Pretty cool, huh?

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Inside the Playhouse. Taken from LAX-Magazine.

Just last year, Playhouse Nightclub located in Los Angeles was the first club to begin working with Klout to better the experience of their customers. They decided to reward Klout users who have a score of 50 or higher with VIP access. First, the door man checks users’ scores on an iPad and if they meet the requirements, the special treatment begins. Customers are able to cut the entire line, receiving free cover before 11p.m., and 50 percent off afterwards.

This is just another example of how social media is working to change nightlife, allowing regular customers to feel one in the same with the other famous people that frequent the Playhouse every weekend. Klout didn’t catch on with nightclubs as easily as predicted, though I do think they could still revive it. Its services could still be used for promoting by inviting the top-ranked Klout users to certain events held, offering perks for coming. All of the retweets and likes could easily increase traffic through these popular clubs, and possibly even help the smaller establishments make a name for themselves.

It’s crazy to think a single person’s posts have the potential to influence such a large group of people, simply through social networking. In the end, I guess it pays to be yourself!