Top 10 Google Glass “Pre-Bans”

Today I’ve decided that I wasn’t quite finished Tripping On Glassid, and would like to expand a little further on the controversies of Google Glass. Just to have a quick recap, the main issue with this technological advancement is whether or not the wearers of these glasses will, at times, infringe on people’s privacy. Another issue is whether or not the Glass-wearers will be safe, seeing as how basically having a computer on your face could potentially be somewhat distracting to some users.

One restaurant in Seattle has already banned the glasses before they even hit shelves for people to purchase. Though a bar is typically a setting for people to be seen, take pictures and associate with strangers, Google Glass seems to have already overstepped their boundaries, in The 5 Point owner’s eyes, and are not welcome.

A Google spokesperson responds: “It is still very early days for Glass, and we expect that as with other new technologies, such as cell phones, behaviors and social norms will develop over time.”

Hilarious picture taken from rockdoc.com

Hilarious picture taken from rockdoc.com

Maybe that spokesperson is right. Didn’t we find cell phones to be a crazy idea? Now we make fun of the huge, brick-sized cell phones a.k.a. the Zack Morris phone. When they added cameras and integrated video into those mobile devices, weren’t we a tad skeptical? The answer to both of these questions is YES! Though with some time and tinkering with the new gadgets, we’ve grown to love them and accept them as the complete norm. With society as a whole, I feel as if we rarely put them down. They basically have evolved to be part of our hands now–not really, but you catch my drift. So will this happen with Glass? Will we get used to it or will the fad die out after a few months? Nobody can find out until the specs are finally released, but honestly I’m not sure if many people will have the funds to purchase them anyways.

More and more pre-bans are surfacing, the top 10 places being:

10. Banks/ATMs

9. Sports Arenas/Concert Venues

8. Locker Rooms/Dressing Rooms

7. Movie Theaters

6. Cars

5. Hospitals

4. Classrooms

3. Strip Clubs

2. Casinos

1. Bars

Though some of these seem pretty obvious, people may never think to take them off and may record the wrong thing at the wrong time. There is a strong possibility for more places to be added to the ban list in the near future, and I’m sure there will be plenty.

Blog-a-day? Complete fail for this rookie.

This past week we were supposed to blog at least once each day, for all seven days, starting last Monday. I only ended up completing four out of seven posts–epic fail. Coming into this assignment I truly thought it would be easy, and not that time consuming.

It was difficult to balance my time for capstone, the rest of my semester’s class work, studying for exams, and my job. Finding the time to stop and write something actually worth reading seemed to be mind-boggling every time I sat down to write. Most of my problem was getting carried away with my schedule for each day and forgetting to post in between the prime reading hours of 1-4 p.m.

I clearly got my butt handed to me, learning that being an effective blogger is nothing to take lightly. My professor warned us about how daunting this could be, and even suggested that we take a couple hours on a free night to write two to three posts in advance to save as drafts. If we got busy and couldn’t sit down to write, we would have a few waiting there ready to publish. I definitely should have listened to him–rookie mistake.

FACEPALM.

FACEPALM.

Overall, I honestly think I failed miserably. Though, now after the week is over, I have a newly found respect for “professional” bloggers, especially those who post multiple times every single day. Props to you bloggers out there that I just described, this is so much harder than I thought!

Tripping on Glassid: The Latest Fad

I’m sure we’ve all heard of Google Glass by now, but if you haven’t, it’s basically a computer that can be worn on your face. It has the capability of reflecting projected images while allowing the person to still be able to see through the lenses. You can take photos and short videos with voice commands, along with features like asking for directions and actually seeing the map. On April 4, 2012, the concept of these glasses was introduced  on a Google+ page. Google named the project for research and development of these augmented reality glasses, Project Glass. The video below from the official Google Glass page shows how the eyewear can potentially be utilized.

A few thousand pairs have been set out into the wild by Google, for testing purposes of course. Though they still remain unavailable for people to purchase, these Google Glasses are already creating somewhat of a negative reputation for themselves. It seems as if there are some major concerns being raised about the intrusion of people’s privacy.  Breaching a person’s privacy is a big deal and can cause many issues to arise. Recording people without their permission could easily bring up debate about the use of this device in public, from an ethical standpoint.

In an article, on NY Times’ Bits Blogs, Nick Bilton tells a personal story about his experience at a Google developer conference he recently attended, and how he eventually felt like he was running from the Glass-wearers instead of associating with them.

“My world came screeching to a halt. There they were, a handful of people wearing Google Glass, now standing next to me at their own urinals, peering their head from side to side, blinking or winking, as they relieved themselves.”

Wow. That had to be one of the most uncomfortable things to be involved with. Huge supporters of privacy are also concerned that Glass-wearers will somehow be able to record and broadcast private conversations amongst strangers, and even possibly be able to identify random strangers using facial recognition properties within the eyewear. These privacy scares have already persuaded a few companies post anti-Google Glass signs in their establishments.

Anti-Google Glass sign from stopthecyborgs.org

Anti-Google Glass sign from stopthecyborgs.org

This past March, the 5 Point Cafe, a dive bar and restaurant located in Seattle, was the first business to ban Google Glass in advance. Once these glasses hit the market for sale, they will no longer be allowed in due to the fact that customers go there to not be recognized, which these glasses could obstruct. The bar owner, Dave Meinert, posted a humorous status update on their Facebook page that received over 150 comments of praise and criticism.

“For the record, The 5 Point is the first Seattle business to ban in advance Google Glasses. And ass kickings will be encouraged for violators.”

These augmented-reality glasses are said to possibly be released for sale in 2014, though, I’m not sure if anyone seems to be really positive on that. Regardless, I’m sure there will be more and more businesses like the bar mentioned above who will eventually ban these glasses to protect the privacy rights of their customers. I guess we’ll see!

Klout for Business? Even better.

Yesterday I posted about a social influence service called Klout. Today I will be furthering my discussion on this topic, focusing on the recently added section of this platform, Klout for Business.

“Klout has the largest consumer base of any influence marketing platform. Our business tools empower marketers to identify and engage with millions of top influencers increasing earned media and improving brand lift.”

Like I mentioned in yesterday’s post, Klout can easily be used to make a name for your business. With Klout for Business, Klout developers are making it so much simpler to build your brand that you’ve worked so hard to establish, and keep your social presence booming by making it easier to engage customers. The Klout Perks are still a huge part of the Business section, offering brand trials for top scored Klout users, and making it easier for companies to hold special events and contests.

Through a case study, Klout for Business aimed to increase the conversation of the Chevy Volt by hosting drive-up events, allowing users with a score of 40 or above to loan the vehicle. This one case study had an amazing outcome creating over 95,000 impressions, and even helped to sell 7 Chevy Volts across 6 target cities! With this case study, it is obvious that the Klout for Business platform can be used to drive sales through the roof, especially if used for less expensive merchandise.

CIRQ

In an article by Tim Peterson of AdWeek, he explains in further detail how Klout is becoming one of the most serious marketing platforms, and mentions their possible ideas for the future. What they’re working on is using geofencing locations so that merchants will be notified when Klout mobile app users with a high score walk into their establishment. If the app user accepts, the merchant can then see exactly who the person is and approach them. Klout CEO, Joe Fernandez, said they tested it among a few small restaurants in San Francisco and also during SXSW with Cirque du Soleil where influencers were upgraded seats for performances. It was said to be taken very well.

The testing with Cirque du Soleil opens the doors for all nightlife establishments to use this service. I believe it would drive more users to post on social media sites about their favorite nightclubs, bringing in more money from customers–happy customers.

Uh. What’s a… Klout?

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For those of you who have no clue what this is, don’t worry, I honestly had no clue what it was until just a few days ago.

Klout is a website and app service that was launched in 2008 to discover certain patterns of social media influence. Using these social media analytics, this service ranks its users with a “Klout Score” which is a number between 0 and 100. These scores are based off of each user’s influence on other people through social networks. Scores are updated everyday from the interactions you have, including retweets from Twitter, likes on Facebook and Instagram, etc. In the past few years, Klout has even started to partner with different companies, giving out what are called “Klout Perks” to users based on their scores. Some of the perks include free products and discounts from brands  like Microsoft, Sony, Samsung, etc. Pretty cool, huh?

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Inside the Playhouse. Taken from LAX-Magazine.

Just last year, Playhouse Nightclub located in Los Angeles was the first club to begin working with Klout to better the experience of their customers. They decided to reward Klout users who have a score of 50 or higher with VIP access. First, the door man checks users’ scores on an iPad and if they meet the requirements, the special treatment begins. Customers are able to cut the entire line, receiving free cover before 11p.m., and 50 percent off afterwards.

This is just another example of how social media is working to change nightlife, allowing regular customers to feel one in the same with the other famous people that frequent the Playhouse every weekend. Klout didn’t catch on with nightclubs as easily as predicted, though I do think they could still revive it. Its services could still be used for promoting by inviting the top-ranked Klout users to certain events held, offering perks for coming. All of the retweets and likes could easily increase traffic through these popular clubs, and possibly even help the smaller establishments make a name for themselves.

It’s crazy to think a single person’s posts have the potential to influence such a large group of people, simply through social networking. In the end, I guess it pays to be yourself!

A Single Twitter Handle Can Change Nightlife

Merriam-Webster defines nightlife as, “the activity of or entertainment provided for pleasure-seekers at night”. Hmm, that seems kind of vague right? I think so, too. Personally, in this day in age, I believe that this one simple word stands for so much more than the definition given to us–hopefully I can change your opinion, too.

Social media outlets now have an outstanding influence on the energy, growth and sustainability that is so very important to nightlife all across the country. Especially in popular cities like New York City, Miami, Los Angeles and so on. These popular social media sites like Facebook, Instagram, and the extremely booming platform, Twitter, have consumed the majority of all marketing aspects of nightlife.

It’s crazy how one single Twitter handle can influence nightclubs and how often people frequent them, along with their opinion on the experience they may have. Rachel Rattenni posted a piece on a website, Guest of a Guest, about how one young girl who goes by the name of @nycgrlproblems has changed New York nightlife by simply tweeting.

Rattenni states, “As she assumes her following consists mostly 18-25 year-old girls from Manhattan, 20,000 is no small number—almost 30% of that demographic according to the Department of City Planning. In addition to satirical anecdotes meant to entertain, @nycgrlproblems has harnessed her network of followers to help promote local businesses that are important to her.”

Social media may seem like something only for the younger generation, but boy is that wrong. Using these platforms should go beyond occasionally posting pictures and videos to promote your club. It’s not just a “cool” thing to participate in, or a current”fad”–it’s a must for all businesses to mix into their marketing strategies to flourish their reputation and profit.