Tripping on Glassid: The Latest Fad

I’m sure we’ve all heard of Google Glass by now, but if you haven’t, it’s basically a computer that can be worn on your face. It has the capability of reflecting projected images while allowing the person to still be able to see through the lenses. You can take photos and short videos with voice commands, along with features like asking for directions and actually seeing the map. On April 4, 2012, the concept of these glasses was introduced  on a Google+ page. Google named the project for research and development of these augmented reality glasses, Project Glass. The video below from the official Google Glass page shows how the eyewear can potentially be utilized.

A few thousand pairs have been set out into the wild by Google, for testing purposes of course. Though they still remain unavailable for people to purchase, these Google Glasses are already creating somewhat of a negative reputation for themselves. It seems as if there are some major concerns being raised about the intrusion of people’s privacy.  Breaching a person’s privacy is a big deal and can cause many issues to arise. Recording people without their permission could easily bring up debate about the use of this device in public, from an ethical standpoint.

In an article, on NY Times’ Bits Blogs, Nick Bilton tells a personal story about his experience at a Google developer conference he recently attended, and how he eventually felt like he was running from the Glass-wearers instead of associating with them.

“My world came screeching to a halt. There they were, a handful of people wearing Google Glass, now standing next to me at their own urinals, peering their head from side to side, blinking or winking, as they relieved themselves.”

Wow. That had to be one of the most uncomfortable things to be involved with. Huge supporters of privacy are also concerned that Glass-wearers will somehow be able to record and broadcast private conversations amongst strangers, and even possibly be able to identify random strangers using facial recognition properties within the eyewear. These privacy scares have already persuaded a few companies post anti-Google Glass signs in their establishments.

Anti-Google Glass sign from stopthecyborgs.org

Anti-Google Glass sign from stopthecyborgs.org

This past March, the 5 Point Cafe, a dive bar and restaurant located in Seattle, was the first business to ban Google Glass in advance. Once these glasses hit the market for sale, they will no longer be allowed in due to the fact that customers go there to not be recognized, which these glasses could obstruct. The bar owner, Dave Meinert, posted a humorous status update on their Facebook page that received over 150 comments of praise and criticism.

“For the record, The 5 Point is the first Seattle business to ban in advance Google Glasses. And ass kickings will be encouraged for violators.”

These augmented-reality glasses are said to possibly be released for sale in 2014, though, I’m not sure if anyone seems to be really positive on that. Regardless, I’m sure there will be more and more businesses like the bar mentioned above who will eventually ban these glasses to protect the privacy rights of their customers. I guess we’ll see!

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Klout for Business? Even better.

Yesterday I posted about a social influence service called Klout. Today I will be furthering my discussion on this topic, focusing on the recently added section of this platform, Klout for Business.

“Klout has the largest consumer base of any influence marketing platform. Our business tools empower marketers to identify and engage with millions of top influencers increasing earned media and improving brand lift.”

Like I mentioned in yesterday’s post, Klout can easily be used to make a name for your business. With Klout for Business, Klout developers are making it so much simpler to build your brand that you’ve worked so hard to establish, and keep your social presence booming by making it easier to engage customers. The Klout Perks are still a huge part of the Business section, offering brand trials for top scored Klout users, and making it easier for companies to hold special events and contests.

Through a case study, Klout for Business aimed to increase the conversation of the Chevy Volt by hosting drive-up events, allowing users with a score of 40 or above to loan the vehicle. This one case study had an amazing outcome creating over 95,000 impressions, and even helped to sell 7 Chevy Volts across 6 target cities! With this case study, it is obvious that the Klout for Business platform can be used to drive sales through the roof, especially if used for less expensive merchandise.

CIRQ

In an article by Tim Peterson of AdWeek, he explains in further detail how Klout is becoming one of the most serious marketing platforms, and mentions their possible ideas for the future. What they’re working on is using geofencing locations so that merchants will be notified when Klout mobile app users with a high score walk into their establishment. If the app user accepts, the merchant can then see exactly who the person is and approach them. Klout CEO, Joe Fernandez, said they tested it among a few small restaurants in San Francisco and also during SXSW with Cirque du Soleil where influencers were upgraded seats for performances. It was said to be taken very well.

The testing with Cirque du Soleil opens the doors for all nightlife establishments to use this service. I believe it would drive more users to post on social media sites about their favorite nightclubs, bringing in more money from customers–happy customers.

A Single Twitter Handle Can Change Nightlife

Merriam-Webster defines nightlife as, “the activity of or entertainment provided for pleasure-seekers at night”. Hmm, that seems kind of vague right? I think so, too. Personally, in this day in age, I believe that this one simple word stands for so much more than the definition given to us–hopefully I can change your opinion, too.

Social media outlets now have an outstanding influence on the energy, growth and sustainability that is so very important to nightlife all across the country. Especially in popular cities like New York City, Miami, Los Angeles and so on. These popular social media sites like Facebook, Instagram, and the extremely booming platform, Twitter, have consumed the majority of all marketing aspects of nightlife.

It’s crazy how one single Twitter handle can influence nightclubs and how often people frequent them, along with their opinion on the experience they may have. Rachel Rattenni posted a piece on a website, Guest of a Guest, about how one young girl who goes by the name of @nycgrlproblems has changed New York nightlife by simply tweeting.

Rattenni states, “As she assumes her following consists mostly 18-25 year-old girls from Manhattan, 20,000 is no small number—almost 30% of that demographic according to the Department of City Planning. In addition to satirical anecdotes meant to entertain, @nycgrlproblems has harnessed her network of followers to help promote local businesses that are important to her.”

Social media may seem like something only for the younger generation, but boy is that wrong. Using these platforms should go beyond occasionally posting pictures and videos to promote your club. It’s not just a “cool” thing to participate in, or a current”fad”–it’s a must for all businesses to mix into their marketing strategies to flourish their reputation and profit.